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TV Expert Interviews / Entrepreneurs / Nov 20, 2021 / Posted by Ted Kulawiak / 186 

21 Lessons Learned in Leadership (video)

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In this Expert Insight Interview, Ted Kulawiak discusses his book 21 Lessons Learned in Leadership. Ted Kulawiak is the President of Ted Kaye Sales Management Training and a much-sought-after sales management and leadership coach, business consultant.

This Expert Insight Interview discusses:

  • Why leading by example is critical for people in leadership positions
  • The importance of trust in leadership
  • Why leaders need to strive to be better human beings

Leadership in Action

In leadership positions, you can pontificate all day and “talk the talk,” but leading by example is the only way to truly inspire people. At the end of the day, nothing you can say to somebody will ever be more powerful than the conclusions they come to themselves.

If the people who look up to you see you presenting a worthwhile behavior model, they are much more likely to take after that model. We see the same thing in all professions and walks of life, including but not limited to sales.

Trust

Trust is a significant factor in sales. The actions that the salesperson delivers or shows the potential customer drive the sale’s intent. If the salesperson is working in the customer’s best interest while protecting the company at the same time, it is easy to see that.

When it comes to defining trust in leadership, we can say that it is all about seeing the leader’s actions and how they support both their coworkers and their customers. This is what builds trust.

Being a Great Human Being

We can all strive to be better human beings, but it is particularly important in the leadership context. With the pressure to deliver results, we tend to lose sight of the importance of being a decent human being, and unfortunately, sometimes this is particularly noticeable in sales. Sales teams are the part of the organization with the “number on their back,” so their value is most often measured based on delivering those numbers.

It is easy for a sales manager or sales leader to get into the perspective of playing the numbers game and only looking at employees through that lens. People in these positions often think that the key to success is “cracking the whip” and becoming tougher on their team members. In actuality, more often than not, this results in anti-motivation.

Our Host

John is the Amazon bestselling author of Winning the Battle for Sales: Lessons on Closing Every Deal from the World’s Greatest Military Victories and Social Upheaval: How to Win at Social Selling. A globally acknowledged Sales & Marketing thought leader, speaker, and strategist. He is CSMO at Pipeliner CRM. In his spare time, John is an avid Martial Artist.

About Author

Ted Kulawiak is a highly respected sought-after sales management, leadership coach and business consultant. As the president of Ted Kaye Sales Management Training LLC, Ted utilizes his significant business experience coupled with a personalized and innovative problem-solving approach to guide clients to reach their desired business goals.

Author's Publications on Amazon

This practical and inspiring guide is for anyone in a managerial or leadership role wishing to improve their leadership skills. It presents 21 examples of real-life leadership-in-action scenarios, with a focus on best practices in business leadership, and emphasizing practical and critical leadership skills.
Buy on Amazon
Based on the author's long, high-profile career in sales, sales training, and sales management, each lesson is illustrated using Ted's personal experiences, developed through individual stories, along with current relevant sales management situational examples, each emphasizing a critical managerial skill set. The concepts presented here…
Buy on Amazon
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