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TV Sales Expert Insights Series / For Sales Pros / Apr 16, 2018 / Posted by Adrian Davis / 998 

The Vital Importance of Building Trust in Sales

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The stereotype of the shady car salesman doesn’t fit the majority of salespeople. Most salesmen and women are honest people who are professional and decent, the stereotype isn’t withstanding. However, just because the seller is honest, does not mean that they have built trust with their client. Being honest and building trust are key ways to create relationships with customers and keep them coming back to you again and again. John Golden interviews Adrian Davis on this crucial topic.

In this sales expert interview, learn more about building trust in sales:

  • Building trust through goal alignment
  • Using empathy in salesperson/consumer relationships
  • Maintaining trust once you’ve earned it
  • Are honesty and trustworthiness the same thing?

Trust through Goal Alignment

Customers trust salespeople who understand that everyone is on the same page. This kind of goal alignment can help create a secure trust between parties. Build trust with clients by taking the approach of, “I understand what you’re trying to accomplish, and I will work to make sure that it gets accomplished, even if it’s against my ultimate short-term goal. I understand what you’re trying to do, I believe in it, and I support it.” If you both have the same outcome, a client will be more likely to trust you to get them where they need to be. “You’re not selling a service, you’re selling an outcome,” says Davis.

The biggest competitor? The status quo.

Often times, consumers will shy away from reaching their fullest potential due to the status quo, or a current state of affairs. It is very easy and safe to stay where you are, but as salespeople, we want to help our consumers get away from the status quo, and move them to where they really want to go. This process can look like helping the buyer become more organized, even going so far as to join the company environment to understand insider politics and culture and navigating the organization of the company away from the status quo. A customer who trusts you will be more inclined to stray away from the safety of the status quo and push themselves to reach their ultimate and full potential.

Have trust? Don’t lose it!

There are times when salespeople can inadvertently lose the trust of their clients. Davis sites the biggest mistake that can erode trust as having a self-oriented perspective. “When you see the world from your own perspective, you don’t have the empathy to see how things work from other people’s perspectives.” This kind of outlook can keep customers from engaging with you on a deeper and more vulnerable level, which can lead to lost trust.

It is notable that not everyone is naturally wired for empathy. If this description fits you, there are ways to train yourself to be more empathic. Davis recommends taking the outlook of naturally curious, and strategic about changing the thinking process from more self-oriented to other-oriented. At the most basic level, just start with a genuine concern for the consumer and their prospects.

About our Host:

John is the Amazon bestselling author of Winning the Battle for Sales: Lessons on Closing Every Deal from the World’s Greatest Military Victories and Social Upheaval: How to Win at Social Selling. A globally acknowledged Sales & Marketing thought leader, speaker, and strategist. He is CSMO at Pipeliner CRM. In his spare time, John is an avid Martial Artist.

Pipeliner CRM totally empowers salespeople in building trust. Get your free trial of Pipeliner CRM now.

About Author

Adrian Davis, professional speaker, author and strategic consultant with expertise in helping chief executives and sales leaders create profitable growth through strategic client relationships. Provoking speaker address senior management and sales groups on the strategy, competitive advantage.

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