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16 Steps to be a Great Sales Leader
Blog / For Sales Pros / Jun 4, 2018 / Posted by Roy Osing / 3011 

16 Steps to be a Great Sales Leader

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How to be a Brilliant Sales Leader in 16 Easy Steps

We get besieged with mountains of advice on how to be a good sales leader. A sales leader who practices their craft according to principles espoused by the crowd of academics, consultants, and other self-proclaimed experts. Whereas guidance from pundits can be useful, it stops short of enabling someone to separate themselves from the herd and become a memorable leader who is different than others.

Contemporary leadership dogma does nothing more than define the entry criteria for being in the game – the foundation for good leadership. Without this foundation, you are unlikely to achieve and hold a leadership position. With it, on the other hand, you are guaranteed nothing more than being commonplace.

Mind-blowing leaders don’t practice the art of leadership the way other leaders do.

Mind-blowing sales leaders don’t follow the generally accepted leadership rules. They are contrarian thinkers, unique in their approach to attract followers. Mind-blowers are not complex individuals but instead look at their charge through a simple, uncomplicated lens.

Here are 16 of their secrets:

They apologize

1. First of all, they like humans more than the theory of leadership. Also, they understand that taking care of people is more important than practicing the textbook rules.
2. Mind-blowing sales leaders ask for help when they are in trouble, and recognize and reward those that step up.
3. They say, “I’m sorry” when they screw up, knowing that what happens the moment after an error or mistake determines their fate.
4. They are fun people who cast off leadership trappings. As a result, they smile and constantly laugh to break the seriousness of many workday moments.

They keep promises

5. They have a fantastic memory for names of people and their individual events.
6. Most of their day is spent in the arms of front-liners, believing that without their passion and engagement, the strategy of the organization goes nowhere.
7. Promises get kept. Period.
8. They are insane storytellers, using real-life events to emphasize what is essential and expected behavior.

They fail

9. Praise is lavished on others, because they don’t need it personally, and they don’t want it.
10. They ask, “How can I help?” in the workplace. The command and control style of leadership gets rejected. As a result, serving others is their priority.
11. Imperfection is an addiction. Therefore, they know that progress gets achieved by getting stuff done, not by looking for the perfect solution. Hence, they know that an ideal anything is a pipe dream and cannot be achieved.
12. There is a trust and belief that their employees will show up to do their job, rather than expecting them to mess up.

They simplify

13. They connect the dots between the strategy of the organization and the role of each person in it.
14. Monosyllable words are a staple in their vocabulary; they find big words unhelpful in advancing their agenda. Additionally, they add the visual element to their communications style.
15. They over-meet with customers; their calendar has little time to do much else. Most of all, customer engagement is a priority over internal meetings. As a result, they sometimes get criticized for showing customers this much attention.
16. And finally, they love jeans – anything to express informality.

Mind-blowing leaders do their thing to make organizational life better for others.

The outcome is unmatched employee dedication and engagement and unmatched sales performance.

    About Author

    Roy Osing is a former President and CMO with over 33 years of leadership experience covering all the major business functions including business strategy, marketing, sales, customer service. He is a blogger, content marketer, educator, coach, adviser and the author of Be Different or Be Dead

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