Sales POP - Purveyors of Propserity
Are You Willing to Lose For A Win?
Blog / True Sales Tales / Nov 6, 2019 / Posted by Elinor Stutz / 576 

Are You Willing to Lose For A Win?

11 comments

It was an exciting time to be an appreciated member of a sales team finally.  My motivation was at an all-time high to pursue the larger companies in my territory.  Most of my teammates focused on the medium-sized businesses, but I always included a few Fortune 500 and 100 companies on my list.

Due to their complexity, larger companies inevitably require a far longer sales cycle.  The typical sales routine does not work.  Visits to multiple levels of employees produce a variety of answers.  Some of the responses are contradictory to the previous.  I began to view moving through the corporations as navigating a maze while finding my way.

The better salespeople recognize they will not win every sale they attempt.  The stronger ones come to accept that the wins are only about one-fourth of their total sales attempts.  Instead of beating themselves up for a loss, they concentrate on a full pipeline so that opportunity is always available.

One day, I was very close to finalizing the sale at a large company.  After many months of varying departmental visits, I was almost at the finish line.  I was finally invited in to meet the person who would be authorizing the purchase.  Adrenaline was on a high, and I was all smiles as I walked into the office with paperwork in hand.

But the worst happened, the sale fell through to another vendor.  The executive admitted that everyone on his staff enjoyed their meetings and wanted to work with me.  However, the decision rested with him, and he decided to go with a competing vendor.  My parting words were, ‘I’m here for you should you change your mind.’

I exited somewhat bewildered as to why I lost the sale.  Habitually, I reviewed everything up to the point of a loss or a win.  Often, we will realize errors that we can avoid in the future or which strategies to continue.   That evening, my mind was on a replay of all the events leading up to the loss.

The next morning, I was still puzzled by what took place the day before.  As I entered the office, a call came through.   One employee confided that everyone was equally taken aback and profoundly disappointed.  To my further surprise, the person asked if I could meet her at a nearby park to learn the underlying facts for the loss.  She was fearful that someone might be listening in on the phone call.  I agreed to meet.

Meeting in the park and hearing the reason for my loss was more astonishing.  The representative had been a former football player.  He and his team celebrated a Super Bowl victory.  Desperate to make a sale or be fired, the former player made a promise to the executive.  His offer indicated a willingness to lose for the win.  In exchange for the sale, he said he would give the executive his gold ring commemorating the football team victory.  The executive became the proud owner of the ring.

The gesture was incomprehensible to me.  Another sale will replace the one lost.  But the opportunity to earn another ring would never be his.  From my perspective, the former football player lost far more than he gained.

In the end, the irony extended to both of us.  We landed with a new employer on the same sales team.  Over time, we became friendly.  Looking back, although I lost the previous sale, I was the one who walked away without regret, unwilling to lose for a win.

The ultimate sales goal is for both the client and the salesperson to enjoy the results. Always work for the win-win!

    About Author

    Elinor Stutz broke through barriers long before doing so was popular. First, she proved Women Can Sell. Smooth Sale was created to teach how to earn a returning and referring clientele. Stutz became an International Best-Selling Author, a Top 1% Influencer, and Sales Guru and Inspirational Speaker.

    Author's Publications on Amazon

    In today's tough economy, most people are too desperate to get any job, rather than seeking one that will provide the career satisfaction and growth they deserve. Worse, they treat the interview as an opportunity to focus on themselves.In Hired!, Elinor Stutz asserts, "The interview…
    Buy on Amazon
    The information is essential for business owners of all sized companies. Everything Stutz learned from her professional sales career as a top producer to becoming a top influencer, according to Kred, is shared in this brand new book. Personal stories including tough lessons are included…
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    Written by a highly successful saleswoman, Elinor Stutz, this how-to book trains women in field-tested sales techniques that will launch them into the next level of success. They will discover how to use their natural kindness, empathy, and relationship-building skills to close better deals with…
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    Comments (11)
    0

    Emmanuel Oyibo commented...

    This piece made me reflect on my previous losses…made me realise those experiences made me stronger and gave me more push for success. Thanks for this

    0

    nsamwa ntobolo commented...

    Thank you so much for sharing, well articulated I agree with you a win win is better than a win lose and sales should be always a win win, we sell our solution to people who need it, the account has to appreciate and see value for the purchase

    0

    Kataya Chali commented...

    Very Powerful Mind Opening article… losses should always motivate us and build us in confidence. Patience and persistence always push quality work through.

    1

    Owolabi Olulegan commented...

    Nice piece as the common deal is win-loose but the best deal is win-win.
    Thanks.

    1

    Owolabi Olulegan commented...

    This is my watch words below!!
    The ultimate sales goal is for both the client and the salesperson to enjoy the results. Always work for the win-win!

    0

    paul Kemp commented...

    Awesome blog

    0

    gerald phiri commented...

    Great lesson on the need to have integrity in sales, without which you pay too high a price, great piece .

    0

    Johnson Adebayo commented...

    Well thought, what a idea. Win more sales and sell to client’s need without losing too.

    0

    Kingsley Addae-Asigbee commented...

    In fact, the salesman followed his selfish ego of having to make sales at the expense of his personal belongings. The executive also acted unprofessionally by not considering the actual needs and big picture of the company he was representing with respect to the offer of sales and its purpose. This made him forgot the ethics of sales such as win-win rather than letting go of his personal gold ring as a commemoration for the football team’s victory to broker the sales deal with the company. I will have opted for a win-win such that the deal being considered must meet the desired need of the company and the salesman should also be able to rather sale something which works rather than just given out the gold ring in tweak of sales.

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    Chukwujekwu Ezema commented...

    Taking a bend for the bigger jump is the lesson from here. I think sales involves the psychology of learning. I most agree with this thought. Thanks for sharing!

    0

    Simon Tarh commented...

    Now i can well understand the meaning of sales. Please do like me and you wouldnt regreat.

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