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TV Sales Expert Insights Series / Motivational / Nov 14, 2018 / Posted by Paul Axtell / 303 

Being Remarkable!

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There are an estimated 18 million salespeople in the United States. So how do you stand out in today’s noisy and distracted world, and how can you strive to be remarkable? Now, I know what you’re thinking – How does being remarkable pertain to the business world? Well, if you are just another salesperson in a sea of other fish, why should someone choose to listen to what you have to say?

This expert sales interview explores:

  • Distraction
  • Intuitive vs. Intentional Perspective
  • Taking Responsibility
  • Be Remarkable
  • Meetings Matter: 8 Powerful Strategies for Remarkable Conversations

Distraction:

It’s a fact that you are not able to give something your all when you are distracted. Aside from the technology that distracts us on a daily basis, there are also residual distractions caused by being interrupted, or checking your email. Even a simple action such as taking a brochure into a sales meeting causes a distraction because the moment you put that paper down, you have lost the buyers attention.

Perspective

Axtell references a book by Mindy Hall about the difference between intuitive and intentional leadership. Intuitive in this case, referring to something that we do naturally and intentional being something that we are choosing to do. Hall’s mantra is that she “wants it to matter that we met.” Walking into a meeting with the attitude of wanting to provide someone with more value than they had previously received will greatly improve how well you are able to communicate with them. You are a product of your perspective – either you are going to empower someone, or you won’t. The choice is yours to make.

Responsibility:

Knowing and understanding the differences between accountability and responsibility is crucial in understanding how to be successful. Accountability can be assigned – you are being held accountable for this sales territory, or you are being held accountable for this part of the project. Responsibility (or ownership), however, cannot be assigned – it is a choice and a perspective. Literally speaking, if you are being responsible, you are able to respond and have something to say about how a situation turns out. All you can do is focus on what you can control, rather than that in which you cannot control.

Being remarkable:

Why would anyone want to be remarkable when they can settle for being good enough? Being remarkable requires a lot of hard work, patience, persistence, and practice. Whether you are trying to be a remarkable golfer, or a remarkable salesperson, or a good presenter. Talent is no longer the deciding factor for success. If you work at something, you are going to succeed.

Meetings Matter:

Axtell discusses the topic of meetings in his book, Meetings Matter: 8 Powerful Strategies for Remarkable Conversations. At the heart of all effective organizations lies the meeting. Meetings provide opportunities to clarify issues, set direction, unify efforts, and sharpen our communication skills. Axtell provides eight powerful strategies, and real-life advice, to put into action so that everyone in the room can feel heard and appreciated.

To learn more about how you can be remarkable, watch the entire expert sales interview. If you would like to purchase Paul’s book, it is available on Amazon.

About our Host

John is the Amazon bestselling author of Winning the Battle for Sales: Lessons on Closing Every Deal from the World’s Greatest Military Victories and Social Upheaval: How to Win at Social Selling. A globally acknowledged Sales & Marketing thought leader, speaker, and strategist. He is CSMO at Pipeliner CRM. In his spare time, John is an avid Martial Artist.

    About Author

    Paul Axtell provides consulting and personal effectiveness training to a wide variety of clients, from Fortune 500 companies and universities to nonprofit organizations and government agencies. A large focus of his work is how to run effective and productive meetings—to turn them from dreaded calendar items into vital, productive sessions with measurable results.

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